3 PROBLEMS WITH EXPECTATIONS

 

  1.  EXPECTATIONS ARISE OUT OF STRENGTHS.

 

We expect what we are good at, what we have grace for, what God has worked in us. To place it on another person and especially our spouse, is unfair and lacks grace. It turns into a demand. It works with the merit system, not the mercy system. A true servant completes what another person lacks rather than placing unkind expectations upon him or her.

When you say that something is not fair, what you are asking for is justice. And justice operates in a legal system, not in an atmosphere of grace. You end up competing with one another rather than completing one another, the opposite of a Christ-centered marriage. We are called to lay down our lives, not to impose expectations in areas that we function well in.

  1.  EXPECTATIONS DEMONSTRATE PRIDE.

We are telling our partner to be like us, to perform the way we do. Wait a minute. Don’t opposites attract? Don’t we want someone who is different, who comes to the marriage with strengths that we lack, so we can serve one another, so the other person’s weaknesses can be accommodated because we have the appropriate strengths? But to expect our partner to be like us, to perform as we do–hey, are you sure you want to be married? (Crazy–found myself doing it early in our marriage).

Wouldn’t you rather be the answer to your spouse’s dream than create a nightmare? What does your spouse long for? Does he or she have a dream yet to be fulfilled? What if your strengths were able to facilitate that dream coming true? You would be loved the rest of your life for your kindness. If, on the other hand, your expectation turns into a demand, you are killing the dream– and maybe the marriage. Good luck!

  1.  EXPECTATIONS SEE THE RELATIONSHIP THROUGH SELFISH EYES.

It’s all about you, not the team. You become a victim, not a victor. You can only talk about what you need, what you want, what you deserve (whoa! That is a word for people under the law).

A legal system will deteriorate quickly, because it removes service from the relationship and inserts the law–this is what you must do for me. This is what I need from you. This is how you can make me happy. Can you hear how self-centered that is? Jesus said, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself…” not enjoy himself, coddle himself, or serve himself. Demand is at the opposite end of discipleship. It does not belong in a marriage. That is why I say, “Write down all your expectations, then throw them away.”

Turn civil rights into civil responsibilities. And his or her responsibilities do NOT become your rights. We don’t meet at the table of negotiation and say, “I’ll do this if you will do that.” We simply agree to go the way of the cross. And if our partner is struggling at some point to go that way, we choose to serve even more, to take up our cross rather than demanding that he or she takes up his or hers. It is the Christlike way. And it makes the marriage a romance, like the Romance of the Ages! Grace instead of law, mercy instead of merit!

3 thoughts on “3 PROBLEMS WITH EXPECTATIONS

  1. You are so spot on with this line of reasoning. It reminds me of an old adage. A visitor asks a citizen what it’s like to be an American. The guy answers “It’s hard work & plenty of it”.
    Marriage can sometimes be like that, but, as with most things in life, the rewards are proportionate to what you put into it. The more you concentrate on serving your spouse, by doing the things that you are best at. The more time they have to focus on what they bring to the marriage. And the marriage flourishes.
    We are told by our parents from a young age that life is not fair, but we stubbornly hold on to those childish expectations. And the truth is that expectation is nothing but a vehicle for self pity and victim-hood. Although we all slip into its grip from time to time.

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