DELIVERANCE (A CASE STUDY) – PART II

A CASE STUDY

(I have included a deliverance experience to give an example of how it might happen.)

Preparation:  It was important to set a proper stage for our meeting.  I asked the young lady if she was comfortable with having a friend present along with her pastor, which she was. Working in tandem enables one to be interceding while the other is at work. The pastor wanted to grow in deliverance ministry.

I asked her if she was comfortable with where people were situated.  I also asked her if she felt safe if at any time we prayed for her with hands on her head or shoulders.  She was. Some are not. I instructed her that I may at times be speaking not to her but to demon powers, commanding them to leave, and that if my voice grew slightly louder, it was not because I was angry at her but at the demons.

I opened with a prayer of cleansing and protection.  I declared that we were under the protection of the Lord of glory, that we believed in the blood of Christ, that we stood in our authority in Him, and that we would allow no interference of any kind from the enemy.

Diagnosis:  We listened to her story and observed her as she spoke.  It was a case of physical abuse over an extended period of time.  It was difficult for her to look at me.  She was filled with shame and her eyes were glazed. I periodically asked questions for clarification.  This took perhaps twenty minutes.

Garbage collecting:  I asked her how she felt about the people who abused her.  She said, “Full of anger.”  She was so angry that she could hardly talk about it. I was looking for overwhelming emotions that might indicate demonic assault.  I did not assume demonic involvement even after hearing her story and seeing her depression.

I told her that I understood if it would be hard for her to forgive those who had violated her, but I shared with her from Matthew 18 why it was essential for her healing and deliverance.  She said, “I can’t.”  We took twenty minutes or more talking about forgiveness, pleading with her to let go of her rage.

When she finally agreed to take the step, I explained that forgiveness did not mean that we felt forgiveness or that we were releasing people from responsibility.  We were simply releasing them into the hands of a just and merciful God, so that we could be freed from the bondage to our painful past. She could not physically speak out, “I forgive them.”  It took a long time before the words could be articulated.

As soon as they were, freedom began to come.  Then she was able to confess her own rage, self-pity, hostility toward others, withdrawal from life, and desire to end it all.  It certainly appeared that her unforgiveness had turned her over to the tormenters (Matthew 18:34). Derek Prince, author of several books on deliverance, says that unforgiveness is the single greatest cause of demonic assault.

I spoke out her confession of forgiveness:  “We release those who have hurt her to the hands of God.  We release her from emotional bondage to them.  We cut her off from the impact of unforgiveness.  And we invite the blood of Jesus to forgive her for her negative reaction to these tragic events.  We speak cleansing from guilt and shame.”  I also prayed an extended prayer of inner healing.

By now (perhaps ninety minutes into our meeting), her eyes and her speech were clearer.  There was no overt physical manifestation of demon expulsion, but it appeared that she had been delivered in the process of forgiveness. I then spoke a deliverance prayer to make sure:  “I command any demons that have invaded this body to leave now and not to return.  Demons of anger and depression—out, right now!” (We attempt to discern what demons have invaded and evict them).  I led her in the baptismal affirmation:  “I renounce the devil and all his works and all his ways.”  And I led her to confess her faith in Jesus Christ and His blood.

Closing:  I spoke with her and with the pastor about the need and method of building up the broken down fence so she could stay free.  I suggested some daily spiritual exercises that would help her walk in freedom.

A CASE STUDY

(I have included a deliverance experience to give an example of how it might happen.)

Preparation:  It was important to set a proper stage for our meeting.  I asked the young lady if she was comfortable with having a friend present along with her pastor, which she was. Working in tandem enables one to be interceding while the other is at work. The pastor wanted to grow in deliverance ministry.

I asked her if she was comfortable with where people were situated.  I also asked her if she felt safe if at any time we prayed for her with hands on her head or shoulders.  She was. Some are not. I instructed her that I may at times be speaking not to her but to demon powers, commanding them to leave, and that if my voice grew slightly louder, it was not because I was angry at her but at the demons.

I opened with a prayer of cleansing and protection.  I declared that we were under the protection of the Lord of glory, that we believed in the blood of Christ, that we stood in our authority in Him, and that we would allow no interference of any kind from the enemy.

Diagnosis:  We listened to her story and observed her as she spoke.  It was a case of physical abuse over an extended period of time.  It was difficult for her to look at me.  She was filled with shame and her eyes were glazed. I periodically asked questions for clarification.  This took perhaps twenty minutes.

Garbage collecting:  I asked her how she felt about the people who abused her.  She said, “Full of anger.”  She was so angry that she could hardly talk about it. I was looking for overwhelming emotions that might indicate demonic assault.  I did not assume demonic involvement even after hearing her story and seeing her depression.

I told her that I understood if it would be hard for her to forgive those who had violated her, but I shared with her from Matthew 18 why it was essential for her healing and deliverance.  She said, “I can’t.”  We took twenty minutes or more talking about forgiveness, pleading with her to let go of her rage.

When she finally agreed to take the step, I explained that forgiveness did not mean that we felt forgiveness or that we were releasing people from responsibility.  We were simply releasing them into the hands of a just and merciful God, so that we could be freed from the bondage to our painful past. She could not physically speak out, “I forgive them.”  It took a long time before the words could be articulated.

As soon as they were, freedom began to come.  Then she was able to confess her own rage, self-pity, hostility toward others, withdrawal from life, and desire to end it all.  It certainly appeared that her unforgiveness had turned her over to the tormenters (Matthew 18:34). Derek Prince, author of several books on deliverance, says that unforgiveness is the single greatest cause of demonic assault.

I spoke out her confession of forgiveness:  “We release those who have hurt her to the hands of God.  We release her from emotional bondage to them.  We cut her off from the impact of unforgiveness.  And we invite the blood of Jesus to forgive her for her negative reaction to these tragic events.  We speak cleansing from guilt and shame.”  I also prayed an extended prayer of inner healing.

By now (perhaps ninety minutes into our meeting), her eyes and her speech were clearer.  There was no overt physical manifestation of demon expulsion, but it appeared that she had been delivered in the process of forgiveness. I then spoke a deliverance prayer to make sure:  “I command any demons that have invaded this body to leave now and not to return.  Demons of anger and depression—out, right now!” (We attempt to discern what demons have invaded and evict them).  I led her in the baptismal affirmation:  “I renounce the devil and all his works and all his ways.”  And I led her to confess her faith in Jesus Christ and His blood.

Closing:  I spoke with her and with the pastor about the need and method of building up the broken down fence so she could stay free.  I suggested some daily spiritual exercises that would help her walk in freedom.

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